Liam Neeson, Ralph Fiennes Back in "Wrath of the Titans" (Opens Mar 29)


Ralph Fiennes and Liam Neeson star once again as gods at war, Zeus and Hades, respectively, in Warner Bros.’ new fantasy adventure “Wrath of the Titans.”

In the film, a decade after his heroic defeat of the monstrous Kraken, Perseus (Sam Worthington) -- the demigod son of Zeus -- is attempting to live a quieter life as a village fisherman and the sole parent to his 10-year old son, Helius.

Meanwhile, a struggle for supremacy rages between the gods and the Titans. Dangerously weakened by humanity’s lack of devotion, the gods are losing control of the imprisoned Titans and their ferocious leader, Kronos, father of the long-ruling brothers Zeus, Hades (Fiennes) and Poseidon (Danny Huston). The triumvirate had overthrown their powerful father long ago, leaving him to rot in the gloomy abyss of Tartarus, a dungeon that lies deep within the cavernous underworld.

Perseus cannot ignore his true calling when Hades, along with Zeus’ godly son, Ares (Edgar Ramírez), switch loyalties and make a deal with Kronos to capture Zeus. The Titans’ strength grows stronger as Zeus’ remaining godly powers are siphoned, and hell is unleashed on earth.

Neeson says he was eager for the chance to explore in greater depth the bond between fathers and sons, and also brothers. “Director Jonathan Liebesman and the writers wanted to mine the difficult relationships between Zeus and his sons, Perseus and Ares, and his complex history with Hades and their own father, Kronos,” the actor notes. “That appealed to me greatly—the realism within a fantasy, the very human emotions driving this story that takes place in a fabled world.”

Fiennes adds, “I’ve always thought of the Greek gods as projections of human appetites and desires, especially when you think of our desire for immortality, eternal strength, eternal beauty and power. We can’t have those things, so we create these larger-than-life characters and fantastical stories.

“Jonathan was very intent on redefining the relationship between the gods, particularly Hades and Zeus,” adds Fiennes. “They’ve always had a difficult history, but this time it’s really coming to a head. The gods’ powers are diminishing as humankind is finding its own sense of self-worth. Hades has decided that the only way to maintain any kind of power—which for him equals immortality—is to release the eternal destructive force of his father, Kronos, from where he’s been imprisoned for so long. Zeus is against this as he knows it will mean mass destruction, so the brothers are at odds from the beginning.”

“Zeus realizes that the gods are weaker because it is time for humans to be strong,” Neeson explains. “He sees the rightness of that, he understands this new world order, and he’s okay with it. Unfortunately, he’s unable to convince Hades, and his benevolence toward mortals leaves him open to his brother’s old tricks.”
Though onscreen enemies, Neeson and Fiennes are great comrades off camera, and enjoyed working together once more. “Ralph is a very dear friend, and it was terrific to have so many scenes with him this time around.”

Occasionally, though, the seriousness of their roles got to the pair. “We burst out laughing a few times,” Neeson continues, “because, well, there we were again in long wigs and beards and breast plates, me with my thunderbolt and he with his pitchfork.”

Fiennes shares, “Liam and I had much more interaction in this film than in the last, and some really strong scenes to play, which we loved. And to be working with a friend is always a good thing.”

Opening across the Philippines on March 29, “Wrath of the Titans” is distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company.

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