No Approved Therapeutic Claims


No Approved Therapeutic Claims. I'm sure you already heard or read this before. Those are the word labeled on many medicines and other related products. Even before, I always frown whenever I see it, it's just another word for "not proven" medicines. It means that is has not been proven to cure, treat or prevent an illness. I just noticed here in the Philippines, people always end up purchasing those popular medicine brands that they see on TV and other form of media like print, radio or even online. For them, once it's popular or has a catchy television ad, they can already trust the product. If a certain product is endorsed by a celebrity  it's already credible for them. Which is not right.

I think those in the lower D and E market didn't really know what's the meaning of  no approved therapeutic claims plastered all over vitamin supplements, weight loss products, beauty aids, immune system and blood circulation boosters, skin whiteners, sexual performance enhancers and cure-all medicines that are supposedly effective for all sorts of problems. From allergies, indigestion, rheumatism, heart diseases, diabetes to cancer. I even think that they don't even realize that it's written there.

That's why the recent changes to the word no approved therapeutic claims changed to “Important notice: The product is not medicine and is not to be used for treating diseases.” (Translated in Filipino: “Mahalagang paalaala: Ang __ ay hindi dapat gamiting panggamot sa anumang uri ng sakit.”) is very apt because those who doesn't understand English that much, will now have a second thought on purchasing a certain product.


Kudos to Health Secretary Esperanza Cabral who started the crackdown on this health supplements that has no or little effects on the consumers. It's very interesting to note that according to the National Health Account statistics, Filipinos spend P150 billion on health supplements and half of that amount is spent on products with no proven curative effects. Just placebo effect.

But for products sold online, do you think they also following the "Important notice: The product is not medicine and is not to be used for treating diseases" rule? I don't think so. These health supplement companies can make millions by hiring a good internet marketer so that can make their products credible online. Plus, those who do multi level marketing online will push all the limits just to sell their products and widen their downline.

Well I hope, consumers like us will be cautious in purchasing things like this.

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10 REACTIONS

  1. thank you for bring up this topic for us consumers will know wat implication this medicine can give to us...

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  2. AnonymousJuly 29, 2010

    thank you sir for bringing up this topic, for us consumers will know what are the implication or benefits we can get when ever we buy this medicine being advertise on TV,radio or even news papers.

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  3. Great topic. :)

    Thanks for the info! :)

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  4. Health is a very important matter. I think people nowadays are more smarter when it comes to buying things over the internet. People should also take into consideration on buying herbal medicine which is an excellent alternative. Thank you for sharing this information.

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  5. No Approved Therapeutic Claims why are they selling it ^_^

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  6. Wow, thanks for sharing this. This is something new to me today. :D

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  7. In other words, be an informed consumer or buyer. Perform cross-checking, as well as background reading to know what you are buying.

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  8. Great info dude..just be careful and be aware people, nako.

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  9. Yep that's right. It is going to be sad for the marketers of these products.

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  10. Thats why current researches and studies were very vital in promoting health for the people

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